winter

By David McKay Wilson As we dined at the Stowe Mountain Lodge’s Solstice Restaurant in mid-December, and groused about the maddeningly warm late autumn, our waitress produced a list of techniques to invoke the snow gods. I’d forgotten my pajamas, so I couldn’t put them on inside out and backwards.

by Steve Jermanok Yellowstone National Park has already attracted over 3.8 million visitors in 2015 and that number will surely increase in 2016, when the National Park Service celebrates its centennial. Indeed, Yellowstone in summer feels more like “forever congested” than “forever wild.” Come winter, these same parks are virtually uninhabited,

  Story & photos By Melissa Coleman “Alaska, take back your winter,” has been a common complaint in the lower 48 this winter and last. “Gladly,” the snow-starved Alaskans reply. Winter, after all, is what Alaska is known for, and when much of the fun happens. Especially March. March is

  By Kim McHugh Remember your first bike? Mine was a candy apple red Schwinn and I wish I could have ridden it year round. But I grew up in Illinois, where the long winters meant trading my bike for skis, ice skates or a Flexible Flyer. Had I been

By Larry Olmsted In this week’s holiday gift guide, I tackle two of my favorite sports, skiing and snowboarding. My picks range from high performance to comfort, at every price point. Unlike many magazine gift round-ups, I have either bought or tested a manufacturer sample, and personally tried and approved each product

By David McKay Wilson Yearning for a powder day can consume one’s thoughts while on a ski holiday. I said a prayer when I turned off my bedside lamp on the final night of our five-day sojourn in mid-December to ski Banff National Park’s Big Three: Norquay, Lake Louise and

What are the best holiday gifts for skiers and snowboarders? Skiing has been one of the main focuses of my work for nearly 20 years, and I’ve skied all over the world in all sorts of conditions, in and out of bounds, and gotten to know gear pretty well, so

Winter is my favorite time of year to visit America’s National Parks. Consider that iconic granite sculpture, Mount Rushmore. Approximately 3 million people a year visit the faces of Washington, Jefferson, Teddy Roosevelt, and Honest Abe. Come winter, visitation drops from highs of 5,000 a day in summer to less than 100 people

By David McKay Wilson Yellowstone National Park has emerged as a world-class destination for cross-country skiers who yearn for high-altitude touring in and around the world’s first national park. On a visit in mid-February, the powder was dry and light – the kind that provides cross-country skiers with plenty of

America’s natural wonders were chosen to be national parks to preserve their indigenous state. Yet, if you venture to places like Yellowstone in the summer, “forever wild” seems more like “forever congested.” Come winter, these same parks are virtually uninhabited, almost returning to their original state. Who wouldn’t relish the