walking

By Everett Potter Just when we thought it was safe to travel again, Omicron arrived. I seem to have spent more time making and cancelling travel plans in the past few months than I’d care to admit. While the coast is far from clear, it seems like carpe diem should be

By Everett Potter As many of us slowly resume traveling, nothing epitomizes “slow travel” more than a walking trip. The best itineraries are a combination of dramatic scenery, wonderful regional cuisine and a pace that offers exercise and adventure in equal measure. It’s the perfect way to reflect on the

By Everett Potter So you’ve always wanted to hike the Appalachian Trail (AT) but you just don’t have the time? Then speak with Jeffrey H. Ryan, the author of Appalachian Odyssey. His subtitle says it all: A 28 Year Hike on America’s Trail. Your read that right. Of course, he hasn’t been

By Sara Hudston Hiking the steep climb up to Dow Crag in England’s Lake District, I nearly got left for dust by an 85-year-old. There were six of us on the trail high above Coniston Water on a trip organized by The Wayfarers Walking Vacations. It was the second day

By Amiee White Beazley George Butterfield, who turned 77 in February, has been at the helm of Butterfield & Robinson since its inception. Born in Canada and raised in Bermuda, George practiced law in Toronto before dedicating himself full-time to the business of biking and walking in 1969. He still

By Richard West “The world is big and I want to have a look at it before it goes dark,” wrote the naturalist and father of our national parks, John Muir. Indeed, sir, which is why as often as possible my wife and I join The Wayfarers for one of

Most folks associate John Muir with his boundless efforts to make Yosemite a national park and as the father of the Sierra Club. Yet, the great naturalist is just as celebrated in his homeland of Scotland. To commemorate the 100th anniversary of Muir’s death in 1914 and as part of

By Julie Snyder My husband, Joe, believes he was a Scottish Highlander in another life. Broad of chest and bearded, it’s not hard to imagine him as kilted and saber-bearing. The first time we traveled to Scotland some 15 years ago, he took to the country like the proverbial duck

By Everett Potter Day One: Delicious Death and Agatha Christie When the phrase “Delicious Death” is mentioned by one of the docents at Greenway (above), Agatha Christie’s summer home in Devon, it has nothing to do with Miss Marple or Hercule Poirot solving a murder. Here in the sprawling mansion