ski

By Brian E. Clark The late, great ski writer Walter Roessing liked to boast that he often brought big dumps of snow with him when he visited resorts in the West. Walt, who penned a Dallas Morning News travel column for decades, has been gone for about two years now.

  By Brian E. Clark In his nearly two decades on the U.S. Ski Team, where he bagged more than 30 World Cup victories and six Winter Olympics medals, Bode Miller had plenty of ideas about how to improve the skis on which he was racing. But those suggestions often

By William C. Triplett In early February last year, when headlines were only recently starting to mention some weird new disease in China, I found myself on an airliner to Salt Lake City. Even though I’m pretty much a news junkie, my biggest concern at the time was for the

  By Larry Olmsted After years as the fastest-growing segment of the ski industry, alpine touring (AT), or uphill skiing, has gotten even hotter and is seeing record participation this winter, in large part because of the coronavirus pandemic and COVID-19 …   Continue Reading       Award-winning travel

  By David McKay Wilson Skiing, like life, is all about managing your risks. In pre-COVID days, I’d check my skis’ safety bindings annually to prevent leg injury, and make sure the ski brakes work so as not to hurt another skier if they released.  I wear a helmet to

By Brian E. Clark In the late 19th Century, Park City was a booming mining center with a population of nearly 10,000. The town’s Silver King Mine was one of the most famous silver mines in the world. Today, skiers and snowboarders can experience a bit of that mining history

By Brian E. Clark When Brent Pratt attended Brigham Young University in the early 1970s, he often ventured up Little Cottonwood Canyon to Alta. He fell in love with the resort, which gets an average of 546 inches of snow each year and is aptly described as a skiers’ Nirvana

By Brian E. Clark About 25 years ago, in the midst of yet another mind-numbing marketing session at Apple in the San Francisco Bay Area, Joe Nevin had an epiphany: “I told myself, ‘I’m never going to sit through another stupid meeting like this,’” recalled Nevin, who now resides in

By Brian E. Clark Woodsmen have been chopping down trees in southern Sweden during the winter for hundreds of years, wearing various types of mitts to protect their hands. In 1936, Martin Magnusson perceived the need for a better kind of glove for lumberjacks, especially during his country’s sometimes bitter,

By Everett Potter On a recent winter morning, in this Presidential year, I had the pleasure of waking up to a dramatic view of snow-covered Mt. Adams, Mt. Madison and Mt. Washington, the latter the highest peak in the Northeast at 6,288 feet. On this particular New Hampshire morning, it