Nova Scotia

By Everett Potter My friend and colleague Anita Stewart died last week, leaving a devoted family, an uncountable number of friends, and an incredible legacy as arguably Canada’s greatest culinary champion. The author of 14 books, most notably Anita Stewart’s Canada, she was the University of Guelph food laureate and the

Story by Anita Stewart A few decades ago Julia Child’s television career was nearly cut short because her presentation was ‘too 1950’s’. Fortunately a wise network picked up her show and the rest is culinary history.  Her presence as one of the earliest of television chefs laid the foundation for

By Steve Jermanok I made a good living writing a steady stream of fall foliage in New England stories, including my latest for Yankee Magazine on escaping the fall foliage crowds on remote peaks, rivers, and bike trails. But if you really want to escape the masses, head north of

There’s a reason Travel & Leisure magazine named Cape Breton the number one island destination in North America and third in the world. The landscape is a mesmerizing mix of rolling summits, precipitous cliffs, high headlands, sweeping white sand beaches, and glacially carved lakes, all bordered by the ocean. The

By Everett Potter One hundred years after trying to rescue passengers on the Titanic, Halifax remembers the disaster. The Nova Scotian capital has a bevy of the ship’s artifacts, as well as a bounty of local seafood and a strong seafaring tradition. Read more of my story in National Geographic Traveler  

By Everett Potter “It took five days for the rescue ship Mackay-Bennet to reach the site where the Titanic went down onApril 16, 1912” said Blair Beed, as we gazed out over the mistyharborofHalifax,Nova Scotia. “By the time they got there, and saw the bodies bobbing in their life jackets,