New York

  By Everett Potter The ultimate seasonal diversion in New York City this December just might be the Holiday Train Show® at The New York Botanical Garden (NYBG). While this is the 28th iteration of the show, an astonishing new space makes it feel like a brand new exhibit. For those

By Marian Betancourt When it opened in 1837 in New York’s financial district, Delmonico’s was the nation’s first white tablecloth restaurant, the first to seat guests at their own separate tables and to provide printed menus. It is also the origin of now classic American dishes such as Lobster Newburg,

By Bobbie Leigh To begin your visit to “Ernst Ludwig Kirchner,” consider starting with the gallery devoted to Kirchner’s last years before exploring his earlier work.  It may seem odd to start looking at extraordinary Expressionist paintings and tapestries created at the end of the artist’s life,  but it is

By “Chez” Chesak What could be better for families than an entire 282,000-square foot museum devoted to the history and exploration of play? The Strong National Museum of Play in Rochester, New York is the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of historical objects related to play. We’re talking about

Story & photos by Deborah Loeb Bohren The beautifully restored Main Arrivals Hall on Ellis Island contains a wealth of information about the roughly 12 million immigrants who passed through its’ doors between 1892 and 1954.  In fact, it is estimated that one in three American’s can trace their families

By Shari Hartford I have lived in New York City my entire adult life. In fact, I was born in the city. And, I expect, I will be carried horizontally out of the city at some point many years from now. I remember the Deuce when it wasn’t a television

By Bobbie Leigh After seeing the Neue Galerie exhibition, Franz Marc and August Macke: 1909-1914, it is hard to imagine what these two gifted artists might have painted had they survived World War One.   Macke, who is barely known in this country, was killed in combat on the Western Front

Story & photos by Marian Betancourt When you look up at the statue of Cornelius Vanderbilt standing atop Grand Central Station, you recognize a railroad tycoon. However, Vanderbilt (1794-1877) began his working life ferrying Staten Island oysters across New York harbor to markets in Manhattan at a time when half

By Shari Hartford As a veteran of print publishing I enjoy stories about “the good old days.” And since I was in the business for 35 years, those stories had better be long before my time. Enter the Life Hotel, or as it was known in 1895, the headquarters for

By Shari Hartford Quirky. Fun. Innovative. Sexy.  An all-inclusive resort on a sunny Caribbean island? No, a new hotel in the heart of Times Square. If you find cookie cutter rooms, bland décor and predicable amenities suitable for your visit to New York City, then read no further and carry