New York

By Bobbie Leigh After seeing the Neue Galerie exhibition, Franz Marc and August Macke: 1909-1914, it is hard to imagine what these two gifted artists might have painted had they survived World War One.   Macke, who is barely known in this country, was killed in combat on the Western Front

Story & photos by Marian Betancourt When you look up at the statue of Cornelius Vanderbilt standing atop Grand Central Station, you recognize a railroad tycoon. However, Vanderbilt (1794-1877) began his working life ferrying Staten Island oysters across New York harbor to markets in Manhattan at a time when half

By Shari Hartford As a veteran of print publishing I enjoy stories about “the good old days.” And since I was in the business for 35 years, those stories had better be long before my time. Enter the Life Hotel, or as it was known in 1895, the headquarters for

By Shari Hartford Quirky. Fun. Innovative. Sexy.  An all-inclusive resort on a sunny Caribbean island? No, a new hotel in the heart of Times Square. If you find cookie cutter rooms, bland décor and predicable amenities suitable for your visit to New York City, then read no further and carry

By Bobbie Leigh The Frick’s must-see exhibition, Zurbaran’s Jacob and His Twelve Sons: Paintings from Auckland Castle is not to be missed.  The monumental paintings are based on the Hebrew Bible, Genesis 49:1-27 where Jacob, son of Isaac and grandson of Abraham,  gives his 12 sons  deathbed   blessings and predictions. The

By Larry Olmsted I write on culinary topics for many prominent publications, and had a New York Times Bestsellingfood book come out last year, so eating out is always on my mind. As 2017 winds down, it is time for an annual reflection on my standout restaurant meals from the past

By Bobbie Leigh “It’s such a zany, New Yorky, bizarre, fun, unique thing to do,” says clinical psychologist William K. Braun.  So it’s no surprise on a rainy Saturday night in December, a group of people carrying huge bags and backpacks lined up in front of a dimly built building

  By Marian Betancourt When it opened in 1837 Delmonico’s in New York’s financial district was the nation’s first white tablecloth restaurant, the first to seat guests at their own separate tables and to provide printed menus. It is also the origin of classic American dishes such as Lobster Newburg,

A great “unofficial” Hamptons getaway

By Bobbie Leigh In his poem “Return of the Native” Marsden Hartley (1877-1943), after years of wandering declared himself “the painter from Maine.”  In the late 1930s, after decades of travels in the United States and Europe returning to Maine intermittently, Hartley goes home and stays there.   Back home,