dining

By Alexander Lobrano When I asked chef Kevin d’Andréa why he and business partner and fellow chef Thibault Sombardier had chosen the Belleville district of Paris as the location for their excellent new bistro Mensae, he said, “The neighborhood is really happening right now.” And for better or worse, it is.

  By Marian Betancourt Barbecue and jazz immediately come to mind when Kansas City, Missouri is mentioned, but there is much more to enjoy here in the heart of America, such as its sophisticated museums, a thriving arts culture and award-winning chefs and the city’s walkable neighborhoods are soon to

By Larry Olmsted Unlike people on vacation, business travelers often book trips last minute or on short notice. But the nation’s best restaurants can sell out weeks, if not months, in advance, especially on peak nights like Fridays. It’s an inherent conflict even top luxury hotel concierges often cannot solve,

By Monique Burns There’s a little corner of Old Vietnam in the center of San Francisco, just steps from Union Square.  It’s called Le Colonial, and it will transport you to the idealized romance of the 1920s when Vietnam was a French colony, and the ravages of war lay far

By Monique Burns If you thought you couldn’t find a good Peruvian restaurant in our hemisphere, book a ticket to San Francisco and a table at La Mar Cebicheria Peruana.  The restaurant is at Pier 1 ½, at the south end of The Embarcadero, beyond the seaside attractions of Fisherman’s

By Monique Burns Like any great city, San Francisco has its fair share of fine-dining establishments.  A major port, the West Coast version of Ellis Island, it’s especially well-endowed in ethnic eateries. Beyond Asian offerings in Chinatown, Japantown and elsewhere, and ubiquitous Mexican fare, you’ll find top international tables like

By Alexander Lobrano Paris without Benoit, a wonderful old bistro on the edge of the Marais that’s been in business since 1912, would be almost as unimaginable to me as Paris without the Eiffel Tower. Why? Though I’ve occasionally had a bone or two to pick with Benoit through the

By Beverly Stephen Photos courtesy of Le District After a solemn and sobering visit to the 9/11 Memorial Museum in lower Manhattan, a snack could be in order.  What could be more restorative than steak frites and a glass of hearty red? So why not go to France? Or at

  By Alexander Lobrano After a morning of musing on the question of where to go to lunch with a friend from London who loves old-fashioned French bistro cooking, the Auberge Bressane suddenly bobbed up in my mind as a possible solution. True, I hadn’t been to this Gaullist gastronomic

  By Marian Betancourt I had long wanted to visit this fabled city by the sea built by Peter the Great in 1703 to open Russia to the West.  Inspired by the country’s great novelists and poets and Robert Massie’s splendid biographies of Peter and Catherine and the Romanovs, I