Knife & Fork

By Everett Potter The hottest restaurant reservation in America isn’t for some chic Manhattan eatery, a clubby Chicago brasserie or a hip dining room in LA or Miami. Instead, it’s for a small, seasonal restaurant located in a former grist mill in rural Maine. The restaurant is called The Lost Kitchen and

By Alexander Lobrano When a rooster crows, the French transcribe the sound it makes as cocorico. Even after living in France for over thirty years, I’ve never quite been able to retool my SONY Walkman ruined Connecticut-born ears to hear that. Mais peu importe, (But that’s of no importance, or, in more

By Julie Snyder The Portland food scene is a deep dive into deliciousness. When my husband, Joe, and I moved here nearly five years ago, we were drooling with anticipation, especially after 14 years in a small-town Nevada gastronomic desert. We quickly discovered not only a fertile food landscape but

By Anita Stewart While the world has taught Canadians how to make oatcakes and pasta, pizza and Yorkshire pudding, perfect sushi and great pierogis — while we roast, boil, bake, stir-fry, microwave, pickle, freeze, preserve, pit cook, barbecue, ad infinitum — Canada’s only indigenous cooking method is that of the

  By Bobbie Leigh Even if you are addicted to celebrity cooking shows or online advice from Mark Bittman or Melissa Clark, these cookbooks will add to your repertoire and come in handy when you are “shopping” in your fridge to see what’s around. Each one promises to teach you

By Alexander Lobrano In the dialect of the Bearn region of southwestern France, Jòia means “joyous.” But ever since chef Hélène Darroze’s new restaurant by the same name opened in Paris, it also means great eating and good times. “I found this space when I was looking for a new address for

By Anita Stewart Langdon Hall Country House Hotel & Spa is pure country elegance in a Waterloo County Carolinian forest. Christmas is one of the most glorious times of year to visit, stay and dine as the snow falls and winter blankets the region. Built in 1902 by Langdon Wilks,

Story by Anita Stewart A few decades ago Julia Child’s television career was nearly cut short because her presentation was ‘too 1950’s’. Fortunately a wise network picked up her show and the rest is culinary history.  Her presence as one of the earliest of television chefs laid the foundation for

Story & photos by Marian Betancourt When you look up at the statue of Cornelius Vanderbilt standing atop Grand Central Station, you recognize a railroad tycoon. However, Vanderbilt (1794-1877) began his working life ferrying Staten Island oysters across New York harbor to markets in Manhattan at a time when half

By Deborah Loeb Bohren Since the mid-1800’s canned fish — or conservas de peixe — has been an intrinsic part of Portuguese cuisine and culture, and no trip to Portugal is complete without opening up a tin or two. With an extraordinary coast, a tradition of  fishing and an unparalleled