Knife & Fork

  By Catherine Sabino Gastronomy tourism is on the up throughout Europe, as elsewhere around the globe, with Italy seeing the number of food and wine tourists doubling in 2018 over the previous year, and France having a third of its visitors coming to experience the richness of its culinary heritage. While

Ruth J. Katz What do the barrel, the screwdriver, the hot air balloon, the bar code, the bicycle, and Penicillin have in common? Not much on the surface, but dig a little deeper and you’ll find that they are all inventions that are the inspirations for visionary cocktails in the

By Anita Stewart The real Prince Edward Island begins where the pavement ends.  Map numbers seem to indicate highways and they always do lead somewhere, perhaps a hard-packed beach where you can walk alone for miles or a sandstone shoreline sparkled with sea glass.  But even with official-looking highway markers,

By Everett Potter At a time when phrases like “organic,” “farm-to-table” and “free-range” have never been more popular, the traditional American farm has never been more in fashion. That’s why Maine’s Open Farm Day should prove to be a very special day in the state.  As a lifelong summer resident

By Alexander Lobrano The recent opening of Brasserie Bellanger is another sign of one of the best dining trends in Paris today–the renaissance of city’s affordable dining scene. This category of restaurants had long been abandoned by most Parisians to backpacking students as the food they served slouched towards mediocrity.

  By Ann Abel Sometimes, they call themselves gastronauts. They are the people who organize their travel, their schedules and even their finances around eating the world’s best food. Some chase Michelin stars or low numbers on the World’s 50 Best Restaurants list. Others will book flights to dine at

By Alexander Lobrano Substance is such a good restaurant that it’s well worth traveling to a quiet corner of the 16th Arrondissement to discover the sinewy talent of young chef Matthias Marc, 25, a native of the Jura in eastern France. Marc signs many of his dishes with a witty

By Alexander Lobrano Through a succession of different owners and chefs, Chardenoux, now known as Le Chardenoux, has been part of my life in Paris for thirty years. Now this storied old bistro has been rebooted as a fashion-forward restaurant redesigned and redecorated to attract a trendy crowd of younger

By Larry Olmsted The brown spirit trend that took off in recent years continues to roar on, and there has never been a better time to be a whiskey lover, with more great choices than ever, in all sorts of styles, from here and abroad. Great new whiskeys have been

By Everett Potter Discovering Ireland through its food is a relatively new concept. In fact, it’s safe to say that no one went to the Emerald Isle on a mission to dine until the mid-1980s, with the advent of pioneering restaurants like Ballymaloe House in County Cork, where the late