Food & Drink

Story & photos by Alexander Lobrano This past summer I wrote a happy piece for the Wall Street Journal about the quickening bistro revival in Paris. Since then the trend has gained even more momentum and also attracted the attention of other food writers, which is a wonderful thing, because it attests to the

by Monique Burns Diners should know at least three things about Twenty Five Lusk. The first is that the five-year-old restaurant is one of San Francisco’s finest and trendiest.  The second is that its stylish bar and lounge offer some of the best craft cocktails in town—not to mention an

By Alexander Lobrano In Paris, the assiduously institutionalized exultation of the city’s past poses the same sort of risk as the sugar water in a bee trap. Like many people who live here, however, I forget how easy it is to succumb to the easy nectar of memory and to

by Kim D. McHugh (Photos courtesy Consorzio del Formaggio Parmigiano-Reggiano, YouTube clip courtesy Walks of Italy) Overshadowed by Rome, Venice, Milan and Florence, Parma hasn’t found its way to many travel itineraries. As a food enthusiast, I was drawn to this lesser-known destination like paparazzi to a movie star. Before

By Monique Burns You don’t hear much about Basque restaurants in the U.S.  Determined Internet searches turn up no more than 50 or 60 of note in our entire country.  You’ll find some in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, as well as Iowa and other parts of the Midwest,

By Monique Burns There’s a little corner of Old Vietnam in the center of San Francisco, just steps from Union Square.  It’s called Le Colonial, and it will transport you to the idealized romance of the 1920s when Vietnam was a French colony, and the ravages of war lay far

By Monique Burns If you thought you couldn’t find a good Peruvian restaurant in our hemisphere, book a ticket to San Francisco and a table at La Mar Cebicheria Peruana.  The restaurant is at Pier 1 ½, at the south end of The Embarcadero, beyond the seaside attractions of Fisherman’s

By Monique Burns Like any great city, San Francisco has its fair share of fine-dining establishments.  A major port, the West Coast version of Ellis Island, it’s especially well-endowed in ethnic eateries. Beyond Asian offerings in Chinatown, Japantown and elsewhere, and ubiquitous Mexican fare, you’ll find top international tables like

By Alexander Lobrano Paris without Benoit, a wonderful old bistro on the edge of the Marais that’s been in business since 1912, would be almost as unimaginable to me as Paris without the Eiffel Tower. Why? Though I’ve occasionally had a bone or two to pick with Benoit through the

By Beverly Stephen Photos courtesy of Le District After a solemn and sobering visit to the 9/11 Memorial Museum in lower Manhattan, a snack could be in order.  What could be more restorative than steak frites and a glass of hearty red? So why not go to France? Or at