Discoveries

  By Larry Olmsted What did you have for lunch today? If you were staying at Minaret Station, a luxury New Zealand lodge so remote you can only get to it by helicopter, your lunch might have begun with helicopter flightseeing over jaw dropping fjords before landing on a private

By Kim D. McHugh In 1889, Colorado’s mining boom netted significant deposits for Telluride’s San Miguel National Bank—so much so that Butch Cassidy and his “Hole in the Wall” gang paid a visit, riding off with $30,000 in their very first bank robbery. Today the riches can be measured in

By Everett Potter I first met Adam Rapp in Namibia a few years ago at the Adventure Travel World Summit (ATWS). He was there to show off some rather cool shirts and pants that he called Pick-Pocket Proof, designed after a year of vagabonding around the world. His company is

By Everett Potter Let’s get the bad news out of the way first. Your smart phone – and I don’t care which one it is, who made it or which iteration you might have – will never take pictures as sharp, focused and defined as a good SLR can. Nor

  Story and photos by Neil Wolkodoff Golf is meant to be a connection to the land and one’s self. Unfortunately, the pace and sandwiching of golf with other activities at most resorts do not allow the golf experience to be more than a ride on a cart through manicured

By Everett Potter Many travelers are tired of paying exorbitant rates to park at the airport. At the other end of their travels, they’re also fed up with the high cost of rental cars.  Now there’s a company called TravelCar that claims to have an ingenious solution to both problems. The Paris-based

By Ann Abel There are a handful of places that defy certain rules of economics: the Hamptons in the ’70s, St. Barth in the ’80s, José Ignacio and Trancoso in the early 2000s. These are places where people who have a great deal of wealth go to spend a few days

By Patrick Cooke Perhaps the most surprising revelation since President Barak Obama eased travel restrictions to Cuba in 2016 is how few travelers care. Airlines, initially hopeful for a Cuba windfall, have now cut back on flights or are using smaller planes to match an underwhelming demand. Not so the

By Monique Burns With spectacular art and architecture, stylish Michelin restaurants and cozy bistros, snazzy cabarets and haute-couture boutiques, the City of Light has an élan that’s unmistakably unique.   But, with the September 2016 opening of The Parisian Macao, French savoir-faire has finally come to the China coast. A stone’s