Discoveries

By Everett Potter On a recent winter morning, in this Presidential year, I had the pleasure of waking up to a dramatic view of snow-covered Mt. Adams, Mt. Madison and Mt. Washington, the latter the highest peak in the Northeast at 6,288 feet. On this particular New Hampshire morning, it

By Everett Potter AutoCamp, the California company which owns and operates luxury glamping resorts in Santa Barbara, Russian River Valley, and Yosemite National Park, has announced it will open a fourth location. The new AutoCamp is on Cape Cod, and is scheduled to open in the fall of 2020.   This

Story and photos by Bart Beeson It’s no surprise that you’re going to have to follow some rules when visiting Chernobyl, the still highly radioactive site of the world’s worst nuclear disaster. On a recent visit, the guides laid out a series of particular rules, most of which were in

By Ann Abel There have always been reasons to travel off the beaten path, from the noble (self-discovery and transformation) to the mundane (bragging rights and…let’s not even use the I-word). Mostly, it’s a proper escape from the everyday in an increasingly homogenized world. These days, just finding a place

Story & photos by Effin Older It was my first trip to China, a 12-day guided tour that included Beijing, Shanghai, The Great Wall, Terracotta Warriors, and, to my surprise, eye-opening stories from the lives of our three Chinese guides—Abby, Stephanie and Cindy. Besides being experts in China, past and

By Ann Abel The world keeps growing. Every traveler I know says their wish list constantly grows longer. Deciding is difficult, so I asked my unofficial (but super-smart) team of advisers. They keep their ears on their clients’ interests and their eyes on the adventures they themselves have around the

By Everett Potter There are a handful of small private island resorts scattered off the coast of Belize, the ultimate getaways for beachgoers seeking peace and quiet in a stunning tropical setting. Seasoned beachgoers like to say that these islands are the way that much of the Caribbean used to

By Julie Snyder When Joe and I moved to Portland five years ago, we joined an adventure book club that convened in a wine bar. Groovy, we thought. Our new city’s quirky personality manifested in vintages and volumes, two of our favorite things. But we’d overlooked one other quirk. The

By Brian E. Clark In the middle of the 19th Century, roughly 400,000 farmers, miners, and others used the Oregon Trail – and its offshoots – to travel up to  2,100 miles from its start in St. Louis to reach their destinations in the West and begin new lives.  One

By Ruth J. Katz “Dazzling” comes to mind when you enter the imposing Corinthia Hotel off Trafalgar Square, housed in a stunning Victorian edifice.  Grandeur with a swathe of modernity. The lobby lounge features a “Full Moon” Baccarat chandelier with 1,001 crystals and it sets the tone for what is