Culture

By Monique Burns I’m in Suzhou, the cultural heart of China, only a half-hour bullet-train ride west of high-tech  Shanghai.  Led by local tour company More Fun Asia, I and four other women, including two New Yorkers, a Canadian from Vancouver and an American living in London, are exploring Suzhou,

By Mary Anne Evans The Isle of Wight off the south coast of England is famous for Cowes Week when the cream of the international yachting world descend on the island to compete in races that take in forty different classes. It’s always held in August just after horse racing

By Monique Burns I  wander as if in a dream.  I am in China, 7,200 miles and a world away from home.  Through spring’s early-morning haze, I stroll lush gardens, exploring pagodas and pavilions adorned with Ming Dynasty vases, landscape paintings and mahogany furniture.  I cruise rock-girt canals and rivers

By Larry Olmsted In the past few decades, Las Vegas has gotten to be much less about chips and felt, and much more about food and entertainment. So, if you are headed to Vegas today, there is a very good chance you plan to take in a show, or two

Story & photos by Michael Kiefer Castelluccio di Norcia sits like a fairy-tale castle on a hill above tree-line, 4700 feet up in the Apennine Mountains of Central Italy. Until last October it was a tourist stop-over, an idyllic, out-of-the-way village that was also famous for lentils, or more exactly

By Bobbie Leigh “It’s such a zany, New Yorky, bizarre, fun, unique thing to do,” says clinical psychologist William K. Braun.  So it’s no surprise on a rainy Saturday night in December, a group of people carrying huge bags and backpacks lined up in front of a dimly built building

  Story & photos by Kim D. McHugh I’m admiring a candy apple red, 1937 Cord 812 Phaeton Roadster, one of over 400 items on display at “The Jazz Age: American Style in the 1920s”, an exhibition at the Cleveland Museum of Art.  Built by the Auburn Automobile Company of Auburn,

By Eleanor Berman With colorful films, dramatic displays and fresh insights into history, the new Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia is a lively account of how a ragtag volunteer army managed to overcome British might to found our nation.  Many personal stories helps bring the history alive and

By Bobbie Leigh Botticelli’s Venus. We know her best standing in an open shell looking delicate and sublime, almost too perfect for this world.   That painting, dubbed “The Birth of Venus,” is about as iconic a painting as you can get.  It is celebrated in Art 105 college classes around

By Bobbie Leigh In his poem “Return of the Native” Marsden Hartley (1877-1943), after years of wandering declared himself “the painter from Maine.”  In the late 1930s, after decades of travels in the United States and Europe returning to Maine intermittently, Hartley goes home and stays there.   Back home,