Adventure

     What is the state of adventure travel in 2009? It’s tempting to simply answer, “It’s all on sale.”     Well, sure, as in every other area of the travel industry, there are discounts galore, and you can see them below. They come from Myths & Mountains (above), named

Photo by Christina Heyniger,  travelofftheradar.com      What's happening to the world of adventure travel during this global recession? The man to ask is Shannon Stowell (above right), president of the Adventure Travel Trade Association (ATTA), an organization that has grown into the largest international association of adventure travel companies. There

    Intrepid Travel is not your garden variety adventure travel tour operator. Not when they can arrange for you to spend 15 days traveling through Uzbekistan for $1,360. Plan a month-long trip for you in the jungle and on the beaches of Benin, Cameroon, Ghana, Nigeria and Togo for $2,240.

  In the competitive world of adventure travel, the small adventure travel companies can sometimes get lost in the shuffle. Which is a shame, because they can provide the ultimate in personalized service — you’re often dealing with owner of the company as you plan your trip. These small companies

With all of the attention on the Olympic Games in Beijing, this seems like a good time to look at some of the other aspects of the enormous country that is China. Specifically, the wilder side of China, the remote places that offer a glimpse into rural life and tribal

If you’re put off by the idea of visiting a national park because you’ve heard they’re crowded, think again. Admittedly, the Great Smoky Mountains received 9.3 million visitors in 2007, while the Grand Canyon welcomed 4.4 million people and Yellowstone had 3.1 million vacationers. But there are overlooked national parks

Richard West It’s true, the best way to drum a place into your head and heart is with your feet, ideally, on a walking vacation. You notice the scents, discover idiosyncrasies, meet the locals. Many travel writers have put one foot before the other before you and written about it,

Looking for adventure? And I mean an ultimate adventure, not a mere walk in the woods? Then check out Riding the Hulahula to the Arctic Ocean: A Guide to Fifty Extraordinary Adventures for the Seasoned Traveler, by Don Mankin and Shannon Stowell (National Geographic). Stowell, president of the Adventure Travel

Cloven hoof prints were about the last thing I expected to see in Tuscany. But there they were, dozens of them, neatly stamped in the soft mud surrounding a puddle on a dirt road here in deepest Chianti. “Devils?” I wondered. “Worse,” replied Tracee, a guide for Backroads, the adventure

Why a Woman-Specific Bike? By Dalma Heyn Twenty-three years ago, Georgena Terry, a mechanical engineer and passionate cyclist, noticed something: bicycles were built for men. Too many women, who usually have smaller hands, narrower shoulders, wider hips, longer legs and a different musculature than a man the same size, were