Adventure

By Everett Potter The current Covid-19 crisis has led to a huge increase in the number of people heading for the great outdoors for a weekend or week of camping, hiking, and exploring. Despite what many outdoor websites and catalogs might lead you to believe, not all of those heading

By Brian E. Clark The year 2020 started out precariously for Wisconsin-based Trek Bicycle Co. But things turned prosperous for the company in early summer, as many people began buying bikes as a healthy way to exercise and enjoy the outdoors. Yet John Burke, president of privately held Trek, has

By Julie Snyder The hunt was on. Our mission? To find an idyllic coastal campsite within two hours of Portland. A scenic spot close to the beach that we could pop off to with a minimum of planning. What a silly idea. Campsites on the coast are scored far in

Under Canvas comes to Maine and Lake Powell. Credit Under Canvas. By Everett Potter For the past year, I’ve been writing about the dramatic boom in glamping and the rise of smartly designed and sophisticated glamping resorts and compounds. I’ve devoted Forbes columns to Collective Retreats on Governor’s Island in Manhattan,

By Everett Potter It was nearly 20 years ago that I first visited the newly opened Moonlight Basin, which lies on the northwest side of Montana’s iconic Lone Peak in Big Sky. The skiing was fantastic and Moonlight proved to be an ambitious if slow-growing resort. Homes, condos, townhomes and

KolmansKop is an abandoned diamond-mining town on the coast of Namibia. Photos by Deborah Loeb Bohren                     Deborah Loeb Bohren is a fine art and travel photographer. Photography has been Deb’s passion since her father put a camera in her hand when

By Brian E. Clark It’s about a dozen miles as the crow flies from the village of Bayfield, WI to Stockton Island in the southwest section of Lake Superior. But on a recent three-day sailing trip in this extraordinarily beautiful corner of North America, my ski patrol buddy, Dave Cushman,

By Brian E. Clark One hundred and twenty-four days through an arduous, 4,000-mile paddle down the Amazon River, Darcy Gaechter was losing it. Frustrated by the slow pace, she slapped her kayak paddle at a plastic jug floating nearby, screamed in rage, lost her balance and tumbled into the muddy water. “I

By Everett Potter The continuing rush to escape to the country during this time of Covid-19 shows little sign of abating. The remoter and more picturesque, the better, seems to be the mantra. The Rockies loom large as a place to get away from it all and of course, the

  By Everett Potter Maine’s windjammers were commercial sailing vessels that were hard-working ships well into the early 20th century. In the 1930s, some enterprising captains began taking passengers on board and the classic Maine windjammer cruise was born, offering multi-night excursions from mid-coast ports such as Rockland, Rockport or