May 2011

  By John Grossmann What you need to understand about Philadelphia is that better than in any other American city, the old and the new co-exist splendidly, offering a winning mix of the historic and the hip. Nowhere is that enticing blend more prevalent than in Philadelphia’s recently revitalized Old

  By Joan Scobey For anyone who eschews a starter and a main course for a couple of appetizers, because that’s where the most interesting dishes usually are, a heartening  “small plates” trend is gaining ground. Think Spanish tapas-style menus applied to all kinds of food, from Indian to English

  By Steve Jermanok In the Gulf of St. Lawrence, the dozen or so Madeleine Islands are unlike any other destination in Quebec—green hillsides, long stretches of beach, red cliffs, and the brightly painted houses of its inhabitants. Once there, you can explore the islands by horseback or bike, try

By Steve Jermanok One of my favorite outings last spring was a ride around the perimeter of Manhattan with my 14-year old son and close friends. There’s no better way to see the city than to slow down and bike along the Hudson, East, and Harlem Rivers under historic bridges

by Tom Passavant It’s spring in Rome, with thunderstorms giving way now to sunny skies. Even the marble statues in the piazzas look refreshed and ready for the onslaught of summer tourists. One of the first things that struck my wife and me when we arrived last week after a

By Alexander Lobrano Though I don’t like its name, L’Hedoniste, because I find it smug (per the Merriam-Webster dictionary, hedonism is the doctrine that pleasure or happiness is the sole or chief good in life), I would still heartily recommend this friendly, lively and very good-looking bistro on the northern

By Everett Potter Portillo sits in a wonderland of knife-edged peaks and turquoise lakes, where Chile’s Andes Mountains climb 19,000 feet into the sky. Yet despite the stark vistas and the distance from civilization, this mountain outpost breathes elegance and polish, a living tribute to what skiing used to be.

By Everett Potter The next time you pull over to refuel, be grateful you don’t live in Istanbul. While there may be bargains within the city’s Grand Bazaar, haggling won’t get you anywhere at the local gas station—where Turkish drivers must now pay $9.63 per gallon. Turkey’s not the only