Hawaii

By Everett Potter It’s not every day that you get to wake up in an $11 million dollar home, grab a cup of coffee and watch a flotilla of sea turtles 20 feet from where you sit, with the magical island of Lanai as a backdrop. But that’s what we

By Everett Potter   Photos courtesy Exotic Estates Maui is the grand prize of American travel, an island of extraordinary beauty with arguably the greatest collection of sandy beaches in the country. Expensive? You bet. But Maui is also saddled with many misconceptions. Here are five myths about the most

Story by Jules Older. Photos by Effin Older. Ask any ten sophisticated travelers where they go in Hawaii, and here’s what they’ll answer: Four will stay on The Garden Isle, Kauai. Three will fly to The Big Island, Hawaii. Of the remaining three, one will be on Maui, one on

By Neil Wolkodoff The Big Island of Hawaii presents a diversity of travel and recreational opportunities on essentially the largest mountain in the world. The Big Island has sand, lava fields, vegetation, two primary volcanic mountains and even rain forests. Your mix of activities should be proximity driven. No real

On the outskirts of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano is a chilled (and at night, chilly) town of around 2500 people. Most travelers zip by here to spend a day in the park before heading back to their resort in Kona, Kohala, or Hilo. But if you spend at least

  On our last morning at the Four Seasons Hualalai, we had to be in the lobby at 7:30 am for a guided paddle on a Polynesian-style outrigger canoe. The kids weren’t thrilled to get up so early on vacation, especially since our son, Jake, had to register for classes

By Linda Hayes Honolulu, aptly referred to as ‘The Heart of Hawaii,’ never ceases to amaze me. In Waikiki, tourists perusing the chic designer shops along Kalakaua Avenue, the city’s version of Rodeo Drive, contrast sharply with the casual beach culture just a block away. Beyond that, a burgeoning cultural

Home to two of the most active volcanoes in the world, one would expect Hawaii’s southernmost island to be an angry land of deadened rock and rivers of red. But this ever-expanding island has a myriad of moods—the gentle rolling hills of Waimea; the inviting sand of the Kohala Coast;

Early Sunday morning and the only traffic on the 11-mile Crater Rim Trail was our little core of a dozen bikers. We rounded another bend and caught our first eye-widening view of Halema’uma’u Crater. Once home to a lake of lava in the 1920s, steam was now gushing forth over