Tag Archive | "Hawaii"

Win a Hawaii Villa Vacation for 4 with Air from Exotic Estates

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Exotic Estates, Alaska Airlines, and Paradise Helicopters is offering the chance to win an epic luxury villa vacation, with round-trip tickets and custom helicopter tour, worth $25,000!

Exotic Estates, a leading boutique vacation rental agency specializing in luxury villa rentals, is inviting travelers to enter for a chance to win a stay at Rainbow Falls Villa on the Big Island of Hawaii.

The lucky winner will also receive four (4) round-trip economy class tickets on Alaska Airlines from any city in Alaska’s US Mainland network to Kailua-Kona on the Big Island. Once guests arrive on the Big Island, they will check into their Exotic Estates villa – epic Rainbow Falls Villa.

To top it all off, Paradise Helicopters will pick up guests directly from the villa’s rooftop helipad for a tour of Kilauea Volcano, the Kona Coffee district, and the dramatic beauty of the Big Island.

All legal US residents over 21 can enter to win this incredible trip by July 5th 2016.

Enter for a Chance to Win

For complete details, Official Rules and to enter, visit the Exotic Estates’ website: Exotic Estates – Hawaii Villa Escape Sweepstakes!

 

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About Rainbow Falls Villa

Rainbow Falls Villa is a spectacular vacation rental on the Big Island of Hawaii. Perched on a cliff along the Hamakua Coast in Ninole, Hawaii, this epic estate is positioned to take advantage of a postcard-perfect double Hawaiian waterfall that cascades majestically down to the blue Pacific Ocean below.

This gated villa boasts its own golf course, an Olympic-sized 16 ft. deep swimming pool complete with two-story waterslide and 21 ft. diving platform, and a tennis and basketball court with ample spectator seating. The pool features two whirlpool baths and the immense terrace that surrounds the home offers the ultimate space for outdoor parties and events, including grilling and dining areas.
The villa’s three levels are easily navigated via a Daytona 52-inch round pneumatic air-compression elevator, allowing for handicap accessibility to most of the home. The entire complex is over nine acres, with nearly 10,000 sq. ft. under roof. The main home offers 8,100 sq. ft. of luxury living, with five bedrooms and six full and two half baths. Bedrooms have stunning views of the Pacific Ocean and enchanting waterfalls that flank the property.
About Exotic Estates

Founded in Hawaii in 2006, Exotic Estates International is a boutique luxury vacation rental agency representing a curated collection of inspected luxury homes in Hawaii, Utah, Mexico, the Caribbean and other in-demand vacation destinations. The company provides a full suite of products and services designed to support both travelers and homeowners alike. Exotic Estates works with travelers to choreograph exceptional vacation experiences with a personal touch. The company is member of ASTA, IATA and the VRMA, and is a proud partner of the Travel Agent community, working with Agents to match clients with the ideal vacation home. Visit Exotic Estates.

Honolulu and Waikiki: Sophisticates Have Them all Wrong

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Royal Hawaiian from above

Royal Hawaiian from above

Story by Jules Older. Photos by Effin Older.

Ask any ten sophisticated travelers where they go in Hawaii, and here’s what they’ll answer:

Four will stay on The Garden Isle, Kauai.

Three will fly to The Big Island, Hawaii.

Of the remaining three, one will be on Maui, one on the North Shore of Oahu, and one on an outer island.

What’s missing from this picture?

Oh, yes — the state’s capital and biggest city by far, Honolulu. And the Honolulu neighborhood where Hawaiian tourism began, Waikiki.

Waikiki beach & Diamond Head.

Waikiki beach & Diamond Head.

Look. Sophisticates have a long history of getting it wrong.

The Eiffel Tower? So despised by French sophisticates that some threatened to leave Paris unless they tore the ugly thing down.

The Transamerica pyramid in San Francisco? Reviled by local sophisticates when it was built in 1972, it is now the most revered building in the city.

The Giant Ferris wheel in Vienna? Sophisticates’ joke:

“Where is the best view in Vienna?”

Dunno.

“The Giant Ferris wheel.”

Why?

“Because it’s the only place in Vienna where you can’t see The Giant Ferris wheel.”

Honolulu kitsch

Honolulu kitsch

And so it is with Honolulu and Waikiki. Here’s the knock on them:

  1. Waikiki is full of hype and glitz
  2. Waikiki is a tourist trap
  3. Honolulu is just a big city, not a place to spend precious vacation time

Let us consider these arguments, shall we?

Waikiki is full of hype and glitz. This is absolutely true. But it begs the question, What’s the matter with that? Sure, if you live in Las Vegas, you might want to escape to a more bucolic spot, but if you spend fifty weeks a year in La Jolla or Little Rock or Lexington or Louisville, you just might wish for a little more hype and glitz in your life. Me, I’ve lived in the South Island of New Zealand and the far north of Vermont, and I fair basked in Waikiki’s hype and glitz.

Old and young on Waikiki.

Old and young on Waikiki.

Waikiki is a tourist trap. Yes, it sure can feel that way. There’s a guy on every corner hawking snorkel tours, catamaran rides, scenic flights and … and what’s the problem with snorkel tours, catamaran rides and scenic flights, again? In Las Vegas, they’re hawking views of nudie pictures, not views of colorful fish swimming past your snorkel mask.

Hotel and palm.

Hotel and palm.

Honolulu is just a big city. The only word I have trouble with in that sentence is “just.” Honolulu is a big, multi-ethnic, palm-studded city marked by bold architecture, rich history, astonishing views, world-famous beaches, outstanding Asian restaurants and gorgeous people. The gorgeousness stems from Asians and Polynesians, Portuguese and Germans, Black and white Americans breeding across the spectrum.

Chinatown dim sum

Chinatown dim sum

Honolulu is also America’s southernmost and westernmost major city, and the nation’s second safest. (OK, it also boasts America’s worst traffic jams.)

Honolulu houses Ala Moana Center, the world’s must humungous open air shopping mall; Iolani Palace, once home of the Hawaii’s monarchs; Pearl Harbor and the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific; and the planet’s most famous landmark mountain, Diamond Head.

Hula

Hula

Looking for culture? The Bishop Museum is the Smithsonian of the Pacific. Waikiki Aquarium is a working marine biology center. Foster Botanical Garden is a living lesson in Hawaiian botany. Plus, there’s opera, slack-key guitar, symphony, rap, ballet, and hula, hula, hula. Mahalo for that.

And while we’re at it, Honolulu has had more than its share of famous residents. Among them, Barack Obama and Sarah Palin; Syngman Rhee and Sun Yat-sen; Imelda Marcos and Doris Duke; Don Ho and Bette Midler.

Thus my issue with “just.”

Here are a few of my own Honolulu and Waikiki faves.

Hula pie.

Hula pie.

The Hula Pie at Duke’s. Pure depravity. We split one, then ordered another. And went back the next night for two more.

Hawaiian music at the Outrigger Reef’s Kani Ka Pila Grille. Much loved local artists play nightly, and sometimes, spontaneous hula dancing adds to the free show. Want more? How ‘bout the best fish and chips in Waikiki.

Outrigger celebrant

Outrigger celebrant

First Friday Art Walk in Chinatown. Even in Paradise, artists help transform a seedy ‘hood. It’s not gentrification; it’s hipification. And it’s free.

Free music and hula in the Royal Hawaiian Center and outdoors at the beachside hotels. Mahalo for that.

The brilliant indoor-outdoor architecture and design of the Royal Hawaiian Center. It may be a shopping mall, but with its trees and ferns, ponds and grassy spaces, it looks like Paradise.

The fact that you may be staying in El Cheapo Hotel but can still access the beach through the historic halls of the Pink Hotel, a.k.a. The Royal Hawaiian. You’ll feel like a better person than you are.

Lunch at Marukame Udon. Join the long but fast-moving line for a taste of Tokyo in the heart of Waikiki. It’s cheap, fun, filling and educational (you watch your lunch being created from wheat flour to piping hot broth).

Farmer's market

Farmer’s market

Farmers markets, Honolulu style. The most convenient are Waikiki Farmers Market at the Hyatt Regency and King’s Village Farmers Market at, um, King’s Village. The locals’ fave is Diamond Head Farmers Market at Kapiolani Community College. All specialize in tropical fruits, exotic treats, food booths and super-fresh veggies.

The fresh leis draped around the bronze neck of surfing legend Duke Kahanamoku by Kuhio Beach.

The outrigger canoe surfing ride on the beach in front of the Outrigger Waikiki. It’s an affordable, self-propelled thrill.

The fact that you save $100 a night for every block your hotel is away from the beach. And these are short blocks.

An ABC store on every block for sunblock, beach towels, aspirin, shades and everything else you meant to pack but didn’t.

So. You’ve no doubt noticed that much of the hype and glitz in Honolulu and Waikiki turns out to be free. As in no charge. Mahalo for that.

Boats on Waikiki

Boats on Waikiki

SIDEBAR

Three Honolulu mini-movies by Jules Older

TEN THINGS TO DO IN HAWAII WITHOUT BREAKING THE BANK

 

 

BEACH MUSIC WAIKIKI

 

 

DUKE’S GREEN MACHINE

 

 

JulesJules Older’s ebook of travel misadventure is DEATH BY TARTAR SAUCE: A Travel Writer Encounters Gargantuan Gators, Irksome Offspring, Murderous Mayonnaise & True Love.  

 

 

effin

Effin Older is an author, writer, photographer, editor, videographer and app-creator.

 

Duke’s Waikiki by Jules Older

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Big Island: Hawaiian Scope

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Mauna lani Bay Hotel

Mauna Lani Bay Hotel

By Neil Wolkodoff

The Big Island of Hawaii presents a diversity of travel and recreational opportunities on essentially the largest mountain in the world. The Big Island has sand, lava fields, vegetation, two primary volcanic mountains and even rain forests. Your mix of activities should be proximity driven. No real public transportation to speak of, so this is a rental car for exploring. It can be almost 11 hours of driving to circumvent the island, so prudent planning says get a map, star the various points of interest, and then start making an itinerary based upon proximity.

Before you land, determine if you will be a resort guest for the time or use the resort as a springboard for endless exploring. If you pick a resort along the Kohala coast, you are likely to get something that will satisfy the beach spud all the way to never sitting wanderer. And, there are options from mega resorts to secluded retreats that offer a departure point to the activities, yet a quiet refueling and rest oasis.

The largest resort on the Island, comprising 65 acres, is the Hilton Waikoloa. Pools abound with the Asian/oriental theme, and while it’s big, you can go there even as a single or couple, and feel some privacy if you carve out your own little enclave just around the corner.

Their dolphin experience and extensive children’s programs make this a good family choice. The spa is quietly tucked in the lower level of one of the main buildings, adjacent to fitness facilities. The Kamuela Provision Company, offers dining right up to the ocean with a large variety of steak and seafood options. Adjacent to the Hilton are the Waikoloa Kings and Beach Courses, one on a historical trail, the other with more ocean vistas.

Rental cars are small, so the best option to get your clubs to the Big Island and back is Ship Sticks, delivered right to the resort. One less thing to try and get on that little cart after a long flight.

Go north about six miles and you will find the Mauna Lani Bay Hotel & Bungalows, which spans 30 oceanfront acres. Koa wood accents in every room, and outward facing lanais give you that Hawaiian feel reminiscent of Blue Hawaii. Nothing in the resort is that far from anything else, so you can flop it or barefoot it if you like the entire time.

Besides great dining at the Canoe House, and Mauna Lani North & South golf courses, formerly home to the Senior Skins game, the property sports unique spa treatments. The “Lava Watsu”, a type of water therapy where the participant is passive, and the therapist gently moves them through warm water. The movements are a combination of massage and meditation.

Mauna Lani South Course

Mauna Lani South Course

Just a little further north, the Fairmont Orchid gives a different kind of resort experience. The site of a former Ritz-Carlton, the Fairmont is like walking into an old style Hawaiian plantation. Through the front door and entrance, and the property opens to magnificent gardens, walkways, and the ocean. The best luxury option is the Gold Floor, with a personal assistant, a special breakfast each morning and snacks in the p.m.

Great dining options can keep you on the property with Brown’s Beach House, an AAA Four Diamond award-winning oceanfront restaurant serving Hawaii Island-inspired seafood and produce. Norio’s Japanese Steakhouse & Sushi Bar is the sushi option right next door and on the property.

Pools circle and meander in that area, so each pool feels a little secluded. Their “Spa Without Walls” uses secluded and lush outdoor treatment areas with water features. The Hui Holokai Beach Ambassadors provides daily Hawaiian cultural activities and water sports including outrigger canoe rides, net throwing, stargazing, historic hikes, and Hawaiian lore.

About 10 minutes from Waimea, are the Mauna Kea and Hapuna golf courses. These courses are connected to the Mauna Kea and Hapuna Prince hotels but do offer non-guest rates.

The Hapuna Golf Course is an 18-hole championship golf course nestled in the dramatic natural contours of the land from the shoreline to 700 feet above sea level. Arnold Palmer, the principle designer, wanted a links-style course offering spectacular views of the Kohala Coast and the Pacific Ocean, and it is Hawaiian-links golf.

Mauna Kea

Mauna Kea

The most spectacular course on the Big Island is the Mauna Kea Golf Course. The photographed hole of maybe all time is #3, a 267-yard par 3 over the water into a cliff side mist and breeze, A slope of 144 and a 76.6 rating means beauty meets ultimate challenge on this golf course.

Instead of trying to go everywhere on day trips, try for excursions which place activities in proximity to limit driving time and increase the ooh and ahh factor.

Day Trip One. On a Friday, start with breakfast where you are lodging. Then head out to the Natural Energy Lab and campus for their NELHA grand tour. Seawater to energy, Kampachi and Abalone farms are a few of the highlights. Go back towards Kona a few miles, and get your burger on at Ultimate Burger, then head further south to Puuhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park (the place of refuge), where you can see the archeological site, then snorkel close by. When it’s 5 o’clock somewhere, circle back into town to the Kona Brewing Company in your swim suit, tee and flops for local suds and some Pele-inspired pizza. Now where is that quarter for the mattress?

Lava Flow.

Lava Flow.

Day Trip Two. Head into Kona on the early side, and choose one of two fuel stations. Basik Acai gives you the acai bowl plus island fruits and it’s portable. More sit-down fair is at Java on The Rock next door, which is part of a local coffee plantation, good food and local caffeine. One expresso deserves another, so head up the hill for a coffee farm tour. Greenwell Farms is the largest operation in the area, and has by far the widest range of interesting varietals. Move down the road less than a mile and get a tour of a coffee farm out of the 1920s at the Kona Coffee Living History Farm. Just a few miles away, the Holualoa Village is full of art galleries and, even more coffee outlets. Mr. Bean has landed for sure. After that stroll, two diverse choices await your dinner pallet. Go for the noodle at Mi’s Italian Bistro, just a few miles from the village. All the vegetables are grown by the chef, and it’s all made from scratch with the Italian Shepards’ Pie the standout. Fish and the best seafood is at the Fishhopper. Get a view of the bay, double potent Mai Tai’s and ocean view dining.

Day Trip Three. Get ready as this is a long one, road warrior to the max. Since you have likely been eating too much, get the food karma back in balance by breakfast at Under the Bodhi Tree, a vegetarian and vegan oasis. The scrambles with tofu and the multi-grain cakes with give you a good charge. Head up the hill to Waimea, one of the rainiest spots on earth, and then over the hill towards Hilo. First stop is Laupahoehoe Point Beach State Park, where the prime activity is inspiration from the powerful waves.

Next stop is the ultimate in flora and fauna, the Hawai’i Tropical Botanical Garden, an amazing array of plants within the 40 acres and a walking trail along the ocean. On to Hilo and fuel up at Moon and Turtle, an Asian restaurant that has a limited menu of five appetizers and five entrees at any one time. Fewer choices mean they are extra good. If the food wasn’t hot enough, then the Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park will be! Self-guided tours along the path, or get in one of the groups. Next stop, the Volcano Winery, where Merlot is tolerated, but the real stars are the local fruit and honey wines, Volcano Red and the Macadamia Nut Honey. That is enough for one day, so continue the circle and head back toward Kona for dinner. Just below Captain Cook is the Sheraton, home to Rays on the Bay, where sunset views combine with interesting fish combinations on your plate and the largest manta dive and snorkel gathering on the Big Island. The lights go on, the plankton gather, and then the mantas arrive to dine on the plankton.

Day Trip Four. Get a late start, and an early lunch, then head up Mauna Loa to the Mauna Loa Observatory/NOAA station where you have made a reservation for a tour. Get the real scoop on climate change as that is what they measure. The last 15 miles up the volcano are twists and turns for the stout of driving, so slow it is and careful. The observatory is on the trail head to the crater and top, so after the tour, you can keep going upward if you like. Pack food and water for sure, no public supplies at MLO, and you will be at almost 12,000 feet.

Trek back down and head to one of two food choices. Toes in the sand are the operative theme at Lava Lava Beach Club. Fish dishes, mai tais and entertainment.  Dine and shop at Tommy Bahama if you want both options in one location, with their famous coconut shrimp.

Mauna Lani Bay pool at twilight

Mauna Lani Bay pool at twilight

Stay in Style

Hilton Waikoloa Village

Mauna Lani Bay Hotel & Bungalows

Fairmont Orchid

 

Dining Diversions

Under the Bodhi Tree

Moon & Turtle

Tommy Bahama

The Fishhopper

Basik Acai

Kona Brewing Company

Java on The Rock

Mi’s Italian Bistro

Rays on The Bay

Lava Lava Beach Club

 

Activities/Adventure

Puuhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park

Natural Energy Lab/NELHA

Mauna Loa Weather Observatory/NOAA

Greenwell FarmsKona Coffee Living History Farm

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Volcano Winery

Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden

Laupahoehoe Point Beach State Park

 

Golf

Waikoloa Kings & Beach Courses

Mauna Lani North & South Courses

Hapuna Golf Club

Mauna Kea Golf Club

Ship Sticks

Neil Wolkodoff, PhD, is a Sport Scientist in Denver, Colorado who has worked with golfers over the last 15 years. During the rare free times, he travels to exotic golf destinations to see how golf, culture and local geography mix in different locales. He has penned articles for Colorado Avid Golfer, Golf Digest and Golf Magazine. In his travels, he has golfed with royalty, tour professionals, the local duffer, and the occasional goat.

Neil Wolkodoff, PhD, is a Sport Scientist in Denver, Colorado who has worked with golfers over the last 15 years. During the rare free times, he travels to exotic golf destinations to see how golf, culture and local geography mix in different locales. He has penned articles for Colorado Avid Golfer, Golf Digest and Golf Magazine. In his travels, he has golfed with royalty, tour professionals, the local duffer, and the occasional goat.

Mauna lani Bay Hotel

Mauna lani Bay Hotel

 

Steve Jermanok’s Active Travels: Spending a Night in Volcano, Hawaii

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Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

Hawaii Volcanoes National Park

On the outskirts of Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, Volcano is a chilled (and at night, chilly) town of around 2500 people. Most travelers zip by here to spend a day in the park before heading back to their resort in Kona, Kohala, or Hilo. But if you spend at least a night like our family did, you’ll soon realize you that this part of the Big Island has its own distinct allure. We stayed at Volcano Village Lodge, which had the feel of a Costa Rican eco-lodge nestled deep in the forest. The spacious lodge with high ceilings, full kitchen, and front porch came with a full breakfast in the morning. Another nice perk is the hot tub which comes in handy when the temperatures cool at night (close to 4,000 feet elevation).

A 5-minute drive from Volcano Village Lodge is the entrance and Visitors Center of the park. We met a wonderful park ranger who told us exactly what to do that afternoon and evening. We drove to the Kilauea Iki Overlook and took a short hike along the rim of the crater in a rainforest to the Thurston Lava Tube, a well-known tunnel created from the flow of lava. Then we had dinner at a ridiculously good, though expensive Thai restaurant in town simply called Thai Thai Restaurant. When the tour buses left, we returned to the national park at night to the Jaggar Museum parking lot. We walked over to the overlook to see the expansive Kilauea Caldera glowing a vibrant red at night. Definitely worth a night’s stay in Volcano!
Steve Jermanok As a columnist for National Geographic Adventure, adventure travel expert at Budget Travel, and regular contributor on outdoor recreation for Outside, Men’s Journal, Health, and Sierra, Steve Jermanok has written more than 1,000 articles on the outdoors.He’s also authored or co-authored 11 books, including Outside Magazine’s Adventure Guide to New England and Men’s Journal’s The Great Life. His latest book is Go Now! Put Your Life on Pause and See the World. He’s currently an adventure travel expert at Away.com and blogs daily at  Active Travels.

Steve Jermanok As a columnist for National Geographic Adventure, adventure travel expert at Budget Travel, and regular contributor on outdoor recreation for Outside, Men’s Journal, Health, and Sierra, Steve Jermanok has written more than 1,000 articles on the outdoors.He’s also authored or co-authored 11 books, including Outside Magazine’s Adventure Guide to New England and Men’s Journal’s The Great Life. His latest book is Go Now! Put Your Life on Pause and See the World. He’s currently an adventure travel expert at Away.com and blogs daily at Active Travels.

 

Steve Jermanok’s Active Travels: Hawaii Paddling with Wild Dolphins

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dolphin

 

On our last morning at the Four Seasons Hualalai, we had to be in the lobby at 7:30 am for a guided paddle on a Polynesian-style outrigger canoe. The kids weren’t thrilled to get up so early on vacation, especially since our son, Jake, had to register for classes at Cornell at 9 am EST or 3 AM Big Island time that night. So I was seriously considering blowing it off. That would have been a huge mistake!  We saw at least a dozen sea turtles feeding on the reef as we pushed off from shore. Within five minutes, heading to a sheltered bay, we spotted dolphins jumping out of the water. “They never usually come this close to shore,” said our guide, a local who seemed just as amazed as we were. He handed us snorkeling gear and the next thing you know, we were swimming next to rows of six and seven dolphins. One zipped right by my daughter, Mel, and me. When we lifted our heads, the dolphins were flying above the water, doing flips in the air. Ridiculous! Needless to say, we didn’t get much paddling in, but yes, it was worthy of getting the kids out of bed. 

 

steve1  Steve Jermanok As a columnist for National Geographic Adventure, adventure travel expert at Budget Travel, and regular contributor on outdoor recreation for Outside, Men’s Journal, Health, and Sierra, Steve Jermanok has written more than 1,000 articles on the outdoors.He’s also authored or co-authored 11 books, including Outside Magazine’s Adventure Guide to New England and Men’s Journal’s The Great Life. His latest book is Go Now! Put Your Life on Pause and See the World. He’s currently an adventure travel expert at Away.com and blogs daily at  Active Travels.

Aloha Kahala! Celebrating 50 Years of Aloha at The Kahala Hotel & Resort, Honolulu, Hawaii

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The Kahala Hotel & Resort, Honolulu

The Kahala Hotel & Resort, Honolulu

By Linda Hayes

Honolulu, aptly referred to as ‘The Heart of Hawaii,’ never ceases to amaze me. In Waikiki, tourists perusing the chic designer shops along Kalakaua Avenue, the city’s version of Rodeo Drive, contrast sharply with the casual beach culture just a block away. Beyond that, a burgeoning cultural community mixes with high-rise office buildings and a busy seaport. Verdant inland peaks rise in the distance.

Although I often stay at one of the landmark hotels – The Royal Hawaiian or Halekulani, for instance – that dot Waikiki’s famous, two-mile stretch of beach, this time I’m returning to a place of which I’m particularly fond, the historic Kahala Hotel & Resort, located about ten minutes away in Kahala, the Island’s most exclusive residential neighborhood. And this time, rather than with my husband, I’m traveling with a girl friend who loves The Kahala as much as I do.

We arrive mid-morning on a perfect Honolulu day. The Kahala’s Grand Lobby is just as we remembered it, the picture of classic Hawaiian elegance with Thai-teak parquet floors, Italian fused-glass chandeliers dangling from the 30-foot-high ceilings and lava-rock walls planted with cascading orchids. All things mainland begin to drift away on the balmy breeze as we drift off to our rooms.

The Kahala Hotel & Resort, Honolulu

The Kahala Hotel & Resort, Honolulu

Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, the 338-room Kahala has been an Island escape for a veritable who’s who of celebrities, athletes, royalty, politicians and performers since its opening, a fact that once inspired former Honolulu Advertiser columnist Eddie Sherman to refer to it as “The Ka-Hollywood.” Signed photos of many of these famed guests are hung in the hotel’s Wall of Fame.

Resident dolphins at the Kahala Hotel & Resort, Honolulu

Resident dolphins at the Kahala Hotel & Resort, Honolulu

Book a room on the Dolphin Lagoon, a centerpoint of the resort, and your time there will be enhanced by the resident dolphins’ playful squeals and splashes. High corner rooms in the tower facing to mauka, or ‘toward the mountains’ in Hawaiian, and over the Waialae Country Club often feature views of eye-popping rainbows. And rooms facing to makai, or ‘toward the sea’, well, you get the picture. (Note these terms. They’ll come in handy when the taxi driver you call after a trip into Waikiki asks whether he should pick you up on the makai or mauka side of the street).

Our goal of spending as much time at The Kahala’s private cove of a beach as possible made our packing simple. Bathing suits, board shorts, flip-flops, or ‘slippers’ if you’re a local, sun hats and lots of tanning cream. (Should you overdo it in the sun, the luscious Kahala Spa offers a healing cold stone and Ti leaf massage.)

When we weren’t putting our chaise lounges to good use, or chatting with the friendly beach boys from Hans Hedemann Surf Adventures, who were there to offer good-humored advice about handling the resort’s fleet of Stand Up Paddle (SUP) boards and sea kayaks, we were in the water.

One morning, we took a private SUP Yoga class with Matt Meko, an easy-going instructor from the resort’s CHI Health & Energy Fitness Center. After anchoring our boards so we wouldn’t drift away, we spent an hour practicing down-dogs and triangle pose and even headstands with little ripples lapping at our boards. Matt explained that the ocean was our kumu, or teacher, and it was moving and changing all the time. Our job was to keep our vibrations calm. We didn’t fall off once.

Passing over the little bridges that cross the Dolphin Lagoon, we were instantly charmed by the antics of Hoku, Kolohe, Liho, Lono and Nainoa, the five male Atlantic bottle-nose dolphins who call the natural, 26,000 square foot lagoon (a.k.a. “the bachelor pad”) home.

Run by Dolphin Quest Oahu, the official Dolphin Quest experience includes various ‘encounters’ (not shows), during which you get to swim, touch (never push, pull, or ride) and play with the dolphins. But the most fun is simply watching the trainers, who consider themselves part of the dolphin family, go through their daily routines – feeding, training and caring for the gentle creatures. A simple whistle or hand signal will send Hoku, who was born at The Kahala and whose name means ‘star,’ spinning, diving and generally hamming it up with his buds.

Feeding time for my friend and I was entertaining as well. Lunch was typically balancing salads from the Seaside Grill, served up in bento boxes, on our knees at the beach. Pupus like spicy ahi poke, fish tacos and edamame tossed with red Hawaiian salt (with Mai Tais and Kona microbrews, of course) at the Plumeria Beach House bar were perfect sunset-watching fare.

Room at the Kahala Hotel & Resort, Honolulu

Room at the Kahala Hotel & Resort, Honolulu

But breakfast was our thing, specifically the vast ‘Rise & Shine’ buffet on the Plumeria lanai, during which plates were piled high with custom-made omelets, Portuguese sausage, macadamia nuts muffins, juicy papaya and my favorite, crisp waffles with coconut syrup and sweet butter. Throw in a Bloody Mary made with Hawaiian vodka and sea salt, and we were more than ready to tackle the day (or, more likely, the beach chairs).

Our stay coming to a close, we’d added yet another layer of experiences to our visits to The Kahala. Charmed by the ubiquitous spirit of aloha, one thing had become clear. We might call the mountains of Colorado home, but we were Hawaiian Island girls at heart.

Details

The Kahala Hotel & Resort
5000 Kahala Avenue
800-367-2525kahalaresort.com

 

 

Linda_Hayes_Headshot-150x150 Linda Hayes lives in land-locked Old Snowmass, Colorado, where she keeps a closet full of “aloha” wear ready to pack at a moment’s notice. She has been a long-time contributor to Luxe Interiors & Design, SKI, Association News, Aspen Magazine, Mountain Living, Stratos, genconnect.com and gardenstotables.com, and has written for Western Interiors, Elle Deco, Hemispheres, Hawaiian Style, Robb Report and others. When she’s not on the road, Linda makes her home in an architect-designed, modern straw bale house with elk and deer for neighbors, with her husband, Kelly J. Hayes (a wine writer and spotter for NBC’s Sunday Night Football).

 

Steve Jermanok’s Active Travels: Biking the Big Island with Backroads

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Biking the Big Island with Backroads

Biking the Big Island with Backroads

Home to two of the most active volcanoes in the world, one would expect Hawaii’s southernmost island to be an angry land of deadened rock and rivers of red. But this ever-expanding island has a myriad of moods—the gentle rolling hills of Waimea; the inviting sand of the Kohala Coast; the almost impenetrable jungle-like interior of the Hamakua Coast; the enormity of two mountains that are nearly 14,000 feet; even a rain forest on the backside of a volcano. Indeed, Hawaii is more like a miniature continent than an island in the Pacific.

Cars whisk around the island, not experiencing that shift of terrain until they’re smack dab in the middle of it. Bikers have the privilege of slowing down to watch the sea wash against a narrow fringe of palms or to stop and smell the pink-and-purple bougainvillea (sorry, no roses here). After a week of circumnavigating this 225-mile island on two wheels like I was fortunate to do one November week, biking over squished guavas and mangoes and through fields of macadamia nuts, you not only feel incredible about your accomplishment, but you bring home a firmer body and a sense that the island has seeped into every sweaty pore.
Backroads features an inn-to-inn bicycling tour of the Big Island that costs $2898 and includes all meals and lodging. You average some 50 miles a day, overcoming such obstacles as sweltering heat, long up-and-down climbs, strong headwinds, congestion on the main road, even biking in rainfall, so best be in good shape. For something less strenuous, consider the outfitter’s six-day family multisport trip around the island. Along with easy walks in Volcano National Park and kayaking in secluded coves, the biking is downhill only. Cost of that trip is $2998 for adults, 10% less for kids ages 11-17.
steve1  Steve Jermanok As a columnist for National Geographic Adventure, adventure travel expert at Budget Travel, and regular contributor on outdoor recreation for OutsideMen’s JournalHealth, and Sierra, Steve Jermanok has written more than 1,000 articles on the outdoors.He’s also authored or co-authored 11 books, including Outside Magazine’s Adventure Guide to New England and Men’s Journal’s The Great Life. His latest book is Go Now! Put Your Life on Pause and See the World. He’s currently an adventure travel expert at Away.com and blogs daily at  Active Travels.

Steve Jermanok’s Active Travels: Biking the Big Island

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Biking in Hawaii

Biking in Hawaii

Early Sunday morning and the only traffic on the 11-mile Crater Rim Trail was our little core of a dozen bikers. We rounded another bend and caught our first eye-widening view of Halema’uma’u Crater. Once home to a lake of lava in the 1920s, steam was now gushing forth over the large pit’s walls, permeating the air with the smell of sulphur. A trail of vapor shrouded the blackened basalt rock to give the lunar-like landscape an even more mysterious look. Halfway through our circular route, the harsh terrain was suddenly gone, replaced by a vivid green canopy of banana and tree ferns. A cool mist enveloped this tropical rain forest, polishing the long leaves with a layer of gloss and giving the chorus of birds something to sing about.

Home to two of the most active volcanoes in the world, one would expect Hawaii’s southernmost island to be an angry land of deadened rock and rivers of red. Yet, I would soon realize that this ever-expanding island has a myriad of moods—the gentle rolling hills of Waimea, the inviting sand of the Kohala Coast, the almost impenetrable jungle-like interior of the Hamakua Coast, the enormity of two mountains that are nearly 14,000 feet, and yes, even a rain forest on the backside of a volcano.
steve      Steve Jermanok As a columnist for National Geographic Adventure, adventure travel expert at Budget Travel, and regular contributor on outdoor recreation for OutsideMen’s JournalHealth, andSierra, Steve Jermanok has written more than 1,000 articles on the outdoors.He’s also authored or co-authored 11 books, including Outside Magazine’s Adventure Guide to New England and Men’s Journal’s The Great Life. His latest book is Go Now! Put Your Life on Pause and See the World. He’s currently an adventure travel expert at Away.com and blogs daily at  Active Travels.

King of Hawaii’s Kohala Coast: The Mauna Kea Beach Hotel

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The beach at Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Photo by John Grossmann

By John Grossmann

At some point during your stay at the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel, even you, who foolishly keep lifting the lid of a laptop or finger massaging an iPad, will sidle up and awkwardly  ease your way into a clichéd but still wondrous resort amenity:  a beige hammock strung between palm trees.

Before you doze off, here’s what you’re likely to hear.  The gleeful shouts of toddlers in the white wash of warm Pacific waters.  Fathers calling out, “Nice ride,” to young sons or daughters clinging to boggie boards.  A family matriarch reminding her multi-generational brood of the time and usual place for this year’s family portrait.  This you’ll hear for sure, regular and reassuring as your own respiration– the beach kissing gentle crash of the surf upon one of Hawaii’s sweetest coves.

This vibrant year round soundtrack has two composers, if you will.  Music by Pele, the Hawaiian volcano goddess, and lyrics courtesy of 20th century RockResort visionary Laurance Rockefeller.  In the early 1960s Rockefeller fell in love with this sheltered white sand beach on a tour of the then virgin Kohala coast (before there was even an airport at Kona) and built what many consider his masterpiece getaway resort.

Indeed, Mauna Kea has you at hello and then just keeps wooing you. Arriving females are bestowed with orchid leis; males receive necklaces of shiny kukui nuts.  You next step inside the hotel lobby, or do you?  The view from the open-sided lobby, with the hotel perched on a rise above the cove, extends straight through to the Pacific.  The lobby walls and columns, you’ll soon learn, were meticulously hued to match the sand on the beach, and the tiles on the floor were similarly hand painted in the very blue of the water.  The result is stunning, a visual infinity “pool” that literally from square one sets the stage for the decades ahead-of-its-time, eco-conscious design of the hotel’s original architects, Skidmore, Owings and Merrill, designers of Manhattan’s Lever House.  With its sleek lines and cantilevered stairways, the modernist look of the Mauna Kea transports you back to its opening day in 1964, when Rockefeller sought a casual elegance that respected the spirit of a very special place.

Many of the below lobby-level walls on the ocean side of the hotel are of indigenous lava rocks, mortared on an angle, as in sacred local burial grounds.  The 158 rooms in the main tower  (the hotel has another 100 rooms in a newer, family-oriented beach tower) surround a plant-filled, open atrium where much of the day birdsongs are more common than human conversation.

“Mr. Rockefeller was a visionary in this regard. He always built places that fit into the environment. You feel like you live outdoors,” says Kathrin “Chacha” Kohler, who heads the onsite realty office.  Ms. Kohler is the wife of Adi Kohler, the beloved general manager of the Mauna Kea from 1973 to 2000. She and her husband came to the Big Island after stints at three other original RockResorts properties, the Hyatt Dorado Beach, in Puerto Rico; Caneel Bay on St. John; and Wyoming’s Grand Teton Lodge.  When asked, she needs no time to think:  Mauna Kea is her favorite.

 

Guest room at the Mauna Kea.

 

A recent $150 million renovation to the hotel following the 2006 earthquake has enlarged and updated guest rooms, wiring in such 21st century amenities as Internet access and flat screen televisions.  (Early Rockefeller rules banned TVs from rooms.)  But otherwise, the look and feel of the resort remain little changed.   The Mauna Kea is still home to a museum-worthy, if not museum-humbling, collection of more than 1,600 pieces of art that Rockefeller had sourced in Southeast Asia, China, Japan, India, Melanesia, and Polynesia.

 

Lobby of the Mauna Kea

 

Believing art was best viewed not behind glass or guard ropes, Rockeller instructed that the pieces, which range from the towering Buddha in the lobby, to an intricately carved Maori canoe-bailing tool, be scattered around the hotel and its grounds.  It’s almost impossible to turn a corner without coming across something stunning and unexpected, perhaps18th century gongs from Thailand or Cambodian sandstone portrait heads.  Especially eye-catching are the traditional Hawaiian quilts adorning guest room hallways. Rockefeller commissioned them, and in so doing, says Kohler, helped revive a then-dying art.

Guests still flock to the traditional Tuesday night luau and the Saturday night clambake.  Fiery sunsets still hush dinner conversations at patio tables. Wild turkeys still roam the grounds. Early risers still look down from their balconies and see a swimmer or two, or maybe three, crossing the cove at its widest in majestically long laps.  At night, around 10 o’clock or so, those seeking a nightcap in the breezy outdoor living room, still hope for an easy chair around one of the gas-fired lava rock pits.

The legendary Third Hole at Mauna Kea. Photo by John Grossmann.

 

Well, one thing has changed at Mauna Kea, actually making the going tougher, not easier.  Its famous Robert Trent Jones, Sr. golf course, which underwent a $50 million renovation and redesign by his son, Rees Jones, is now as far from a softie resort course as the back tee on its legendary par 3 third hole is from the green.  A slew of additional sand traps, plus tricky, elevated greens make the revamped links a true test of club selection and shot making, earning it the rank of #27 on Golf Digest’s top 100 courses. “Choose your tees wisely,” is the advice in the pro shop.

About that third hole.  One of the most photographed golf holes in the world, its back tee stands 272 yards from the center of the green, virtually all of that necessarily in the air across a scenic but imposing stretch of blue Pacific.  Other tees cut the carry down to more manageable distances, as proved necessary for the course’s maiden round, played on December 8, 1964 for a Shell Wonderful World of Golf broadcast featuring the dream threesome of Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus, and Gary Player.  The story goes that on the practice round the day before, the tenacious but diminutive Player found himself unable to clear the water (a tougher test back then with less high tech clubs and balls) and so for the competition the trio moved down a tee to a more manageable, 205-yard shot.  Even non-golfers will want to take in the view from this supremely challenging (especially with a headwind) ocean side rectangle of green, occasionally reserved for wedding dinners and, one understands, the final resting spot for the ashes of more than one golfer.

If the mark of a great resort is the difficulty in selecting a single favorite or special spot, then the Mauna Kea surely measures up.  You might cite the third tee.  Or choose the world-class beach. Or the incomparable lobby. Perhaps an evening seat by a fiery lava pit.  But if you’re one of those who needs to unwind more than you care to admit, you just might confess to a hammock in the shade, but only, of course, after you wake up from the delightful indulgence of an al fresco nap.

 

Visit the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel

 

John Grossmann has written about food and travel for Gourmet, Cigar Aficionado, Saveur, and SKY. He was a finalist in the food journalist category of the 2010 Le Cordon Bleu World Food Media Awards. He is the co-author, with acoustic ecologist Gordon Hempton, of the book One Square Inch of Silence, (Free Press).

 

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