Knife & Fork

Story and photos by Alexander Lobrano Not long after we were seated for dinner at Detour, a delightful vest-pocket bistro just a few minutes from my front door in the 9th Arrondissement of Paris, the thought recurred to me. For the last few months, I’ve found myself thinking that the

By Richard West Europe is made up of coffeehouses, of cafes: places of assignation and conspiracy, for intellectual debate and gossip, for the flaneur and the poet scribbling in his notebook. “Draw a coffeehouse map and you have one of the essential markers of the ‘idea of Europe,’” wrote cultural

  By Marian Betancourt When it opened in 1837 Delmonico’s in New York’s financial district was the nation’s first white tablecloth restaurant, the first to seat guests at their own separate tables and to provide printed menus. It is also the origin of classic American dishes such as Lobster Newburg,

What has changed in the last three years is the return of local chefs who have made their stamp elsewhere and have a unique perspective on their cuisine’s history and local flavor

By Beverly Stephen They’re from the Midwest. They didn’t grow up eating fried chicken. There were no Southern grandmothers with a secret touch.  When they went to research the best fried chicken recipes for their restaurant, where did Christine Cikowski and Josh Kulp turn? To Edna Lewis? To Leah Chase?

By Alexander Lobrano The Divellec is one of the most beautiful new restaurants to open in Paris for a very longtime. As wonderfully louche as Studio K.O.’s Miami-meets-1940s Casablanca-in-Paris decor may be, however, what always matters most to me at a restaurant is the food, which is superb. Still, even

By Ruth J.  Katz Quintessential New York:  Christmas. The ormolu-dotted Grand Tier of the Metropolitan Opera House, chandeliers gleaming.  The sky gently bruised a soft gray.  Twinkling snowflakes landing silently in the Lincoln Center Plaza.  In the distance across Broadway, a Christmas tree glimmering with seasonal cheer. In this cinematic

There are so many innovative, sophisticated food crawls cropping up—often led by chefs, journalists and cookbook authors.

By Everett Potter There’s nothing quite like hotel room service. Be it an indulgence or a necessity, few things seem better suited to serve a jet-lagged traveler than a freshly delivered breakfast tray or a late-night sandwich. While seasoned road warriors may have their room service routines down to a

By Alexander Lobrano At Restaurant Jean, just down the street from me in the beautiful but increasingly booshie 9th Arrondissement, a lavishly well-inked young chef has given an exciting new life to a table that had been lost for a little while. If fact, Jean-Frédéric Guidoni, this restaurant’s amiable owner,