Knife & Fork

By Rochelle Lash The enduring allure of Quebec City is that whatever is conspicuously old and venerable also is remarkably new and avant-garde. And when we say old, we really mean old. Here, cobblestones and convents date to the 1600s. And when we say new, we mean progressive bistronomy by

By Alexander Lobrano With a menu of artisanally made pastas napped with vibrant Asian inspired sauces and a sidewalk terrace on the quieter end of Boulevard Saint Germain in the 5th Arrondissement, chef William Ledeuil’s restaurant Kitchen Ter(re) is the best new restaurant in Paris this summer. Ledeuil, one of the most

By Julie Snyder My husband, Joe, who happily leaves travel planning in my hands, had just two requests for our recent stopover in Paris. Predictably, one of them involved books and the other, cocktails. The literary destination? Shakespeare & Company. The cocktail venue? (You can probably see where this is

In the summer of 1999, I sat along the shores of Lake Geneva in the bucolic Swiss city of Vevey — along with a couple of thousand other spectators — and watched a spectacle that celebrated the glories of wine. This was no ordinary bacchanal but the Fête des Vignerons,

by Kim D. McHugh I’m 30 minutes into a 40-minute wait to get my hands on one of what I’ve been told is the best gyro in Ohio—and maybe the United States—at Steve’s Gyros. Opened in 1989 the walk-up stand—one of over 100 inside Cleveland’s West Side Market—is undeniably popular

By Alexander Lobrano In Paris, Arnaud Nicolas, 34, has launched a spectacularly succulent revolution at the new restaurant and boutique that bears his name on the leafy Avenue de la Bourdonnais in the ever so discreetly chic 7th Arrondissement. Stopping by this elegant pair of rooms with oak parquet floors,

Story and photos by Alexander Lobrano Not long after we were seated for dinner at Detour, a delightful vest-pocket bistro just a few minutes from my front door in the 9th Arrondissement of Paris, the thought recurred to me. For the last few months, I’ve found myself thinking that the

By Richard West Europe is made up of coffeehouses, of cafes: places of assignation and conspiracy, for intellectual debate and gossip, for the flaneur and the poet scribbling in his notebook. “Draw a coffeehouse map and you have one of the essential markers of the ‘idea of Europe,’” wrote cultural

  By Marian Betancourt When it opened in 1837 Delmonico’s in New York’s financial district was the nation’s first white tablecloth restaurant, the first to seat guests at their own separate tables and to provide printed menus. It is also the origin of classic American dishes such as Lobster Newburg,

What has changed in the last three years is the return of local chefs who have made their stamp elsewhere and have a unique perspective on their cuisine’s history and local flavor