Artful Traveler

By Bobbie Leigh In his poem “Return of the Native” Marsden Hartley (1877-1943), after years of wandering declared himself “the painter from Maine.”  In the late 1930s, after decades of travels in the United States and Europe returning to Maine intermittently, Hartley goes home and stays there.   Back home,

By Everett Potter Since the early 1960’s, I have spent part — usually the better part — of my summers in Western Maine. The distinctive mountains, pine trees, granite outcroppings and deep blue lakes that I know so well were all subject matter for the Maine painter Marsden Hartley (1877-1943).

By Bobbie Leigh The English writer  Stevie Smith liked  to write about characters who disappeared into the objects of their gaze. In one of her stories an office  girl goes to the National Gallery during her lunch break and studies  Turner seascapes  until “the spray reached out and sucked her

By Everett Potter Images courtesy of Kitzbühel Museum The Austrian ski town of Kitzbühel may be best known in skiing circles for challenges like the men’s World Cup downhill on the Hahnenkamm, one of the most dramatic courses in the sport. But those two minutes aside, it also happens to be

By Bobbie Leigh “All art is erotic,” Viennese painter Gustav Klimt famously said.   Klimt loved many women, fathered some 14 children, and never married. Women as well as his art patrons and collectors apparently adored him.  Although he is said to have had many affairs, his true love, who may

Story & photos by Monique Burns I’m headed to Berlin.  After two or three years of hearing how incredibly hip the German capital is, my curiosity finally has gotten the better of me.  It’s fall 2015—the 25th anniversary of German Reunification, proclaimed in 1990, a year after the Berlin Wall

By Bobbie Leigh Have you ever heard of a collector commissioning a work of art  saying: “Do what you want and I will love it.”  Neale Albert is that rarity.  He is a  collector who commissions artists to  create miniature bookbindings and  asks  only that they give him their best

By Bobbie Leigh It’s not the little house on the prairie.  And it’s not as scary as the sinister mansion next to the Bates Motel  in the Alfred Hitchcock film Psycho. The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s s new Roof  Garden Commission “Transitional Object  (PsychoBarn)”  is inspired  in part  by the film but

By Steve Jermanok When the actor Steve Martin first viewed a painting by Lawren Harris, he mistook it for a work by Rockwell Kent. “I thought it was the best Rockwell Kent I’ve ever seen,” says Martin, punctuated by his legendary laugh. “It was breathtaking.” That was over 20 years

By Bobbie Leigh Art critic and painter Roger de Piles said it best: “Excepting Titian only, van Dyck surpasses all the painters that went before him, or have come after him, in portraits.”   That was in 1706.  Still true? You can decide after seeing the phenomenal exhibition, “Van Dyck: The