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Hotel d’Inghliterra, an Intimate Roman Palazzo

 

Hotel d’Inghliterra is tucked into a quiet corner of one of Rome’s poshest shopping areas. Photo credit: Hotel d’Inghliterra
Hotel d’Inghliterra is tucked into a quiet corner of one of Rome’s poshest shopping areas.
Photo credit: Hotel d’Inghliterra

by Geri Bain

Sipping the “welcome” Prosecco we were offered as we checked in, my husband, daughter and I had the sense that we were guests in someone’s elegant townhome, not a hotel in the heart of one of Rome’s most fashionable shopping areas. In fact, the hotel was originally built in 1660 to house aristocratic guests visiting the Palazzo di Torlonia across the street, whose gilded ballroom now hosts weddings and meetings for guests. Converted to a hotel in 1845, the Hotel d’Inghliterra was named for the British tourists who favored it, including romantic poet John Keats. During the Dolce Vita years, hotel guests might have spotted Elizabeth Taylor, Gregory Peck, Mark Twain and Ernest Hemingway, all frequent visitors.

Intimate sitting rooms create the sense of staying in a private home. Photo credit: Hotel d’Inghliterra
Intimate sitting rooms create the sense of staying in a private home. Photo credit: Hotel d’Inghliterra

 

The hotel’s public spaces, a library, several intimate living rooms and the wood-paneled Bond Bar, felt far removed from the bustle of the Via Condotti and Spanish Steps, both just minutes away on foot. The public rooms have recently been redone as part of a multi-year renovation that is almost complete. Throughout the hotel, original antiques, huge baroque mirrors, period furniture upholstered with silk and damask, Chinese porcelain and modern art pieces have been individually selected for each room.

 

The fourth floor renovation features indulgent marble bathrooms, complete with an in-mirror TV screen. Photo credit: Hotel d’Inghliterra
The fourth floor renovation features indulgent marble bathrooms, complete with an in-mirror TV screen. Photo credit: Hotel d’Inghliterra

As in a private home, each of the public and guest rooms is uniquely sized and decorated so there is great variety even within the same room category. On the fourth floor, where we stayed, rooms tend to be larger, with spacious marble bathrooms that include a large soaking tub, in-mirror TV, separate rain shower, bidet and heated towel rack. Many have small balconies as well.

 

Each room is uniquely decorated, with its own color scheme and artwork. Photo credit: Hotel d’Inghliterra
Each room is uniquely decorated, with its own color scheme and artwork. Photo credit: Hotel d’Inghliterra

Second floor rooms tend to be smaller, especially the bathrooms, but have romantic high ceilings. The third floor had not been redone as of press time, but the ultimate accommodations are the terraced suites, which afford wonderful views of the city. The Penthouse Suite has working fireplaces as well as jasmine bushes, lemon and wild orange trees on its 200 square meter terrace, while one of the Royal suites has its own private sauna.

The hotel’s Cafe Romano offers al fresco seating along the pedestrian-only Via Borgognona. Photo credit: Hotel d’Inghliterra
The hotel’s Cafe Romano offers al fresco seating along the pedestrian-only Via Borgognona.
Photo credit: Hotel d’Inghliterra

 

We enjoyed the generous buffet breakfasts at hotel’s Cafe Romano, which offers indoor and al fresco dining. Throughout the day, the restaurant also serves great homemade pastas and a changing menu of Italian specialties using farm-to-table ingredients at surprisingly reasonable prices, and one of our favorite parts of staying at the hotel was being able to walk to our choice of Rome’s historic attractions and landmarks, come “home” to unwind and dine, and then stroll over to the Trevi Fountain, Spanish Steps or Piazza Navona before returning to our intimate hideaway in the heart of Rome.

www.niquesahotels.com/inghilterra

Geri Bain, a widely published travel writer and editor, has written about more than 60 countries and contributed to publications including inc.com, N.Y. Daily News and Robb Report. While travel editor at Modern Bride magazine, she wrote an acclaimed guide to Honeymoons and Weddings Away. She is a past president of the New York Travel Writers Association and former editorial director of Endless Vacation magazine.
Geri Bain, a widely published travel writer and editor, has written about more than 60 countries and contributed to publications including inc.com, N.Y. Daily News and Robb Report. While travel editor at Modern Bride magazine, she wrote an acclaimed guide to Honeymoons and Weddings Away. She is a past president of the New York Travel Writers Association and former editorial director of Endless Vacation magazine.
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