Home»Getaways»Europe»The Grand Train Stations of Paris

The Grand Train Stations of Paris

[SlideDeck2 id=16902]

Text and photographs by Deborah Loeb Bohren

 

The six grand train stations of Paris represent the best of design and architecture of their time boasting exquisite ironwork, intricate masonry, paintings and murals, and a myriad of clocks inside and out. Each station was designed to make the best possible first impression on travelers to Paris and all of the stations serve different regions, their names often offering clues.
Paris’ oldest train station, Gare Saint-Lazare was inaugurated in 1837.  Gare de L’Est opened in 1849 and hosted the original Orient Express on its premier journey to Istanbul in 1883. Gare du Nord is the largest station in Paris and its modern neoclassical architecture is decorated with 23 statues each representing the cities served, including Paris. Completely rebuilt to accommodate the influx of  travelers visiting the World Exposition of 1900, the Gare de Lyon has been home to the iconic (and ornate) Le Train Bleu restaurant for 115 years.Gare d’Austerlitz, originally know as the Gare d’Orleans, was renamed for the location of one of Napoleon’s most famous battles and its facades and roofs have earned it recognition as a historical monument. The glass, steel and concrete Gare Montparnesse traces it’s roots to 1840 but was rebuilt in the middle of the last century and exemplifies 1960s modernism.Step inside of these stations and, if you look carefully, you can still feel the air of anticipation and be transported to an era when train travel represented a grand adventure and endless possibilities rather than the hassle of a daily commute.

Deborah Loeb Bohren is a fine art and travel photographer. Photography has been Deb’s passion since her father put a camera in her hand when she was only five years old. Today she combines that passion with her love of travel, using her camera to capture the intersection and interplay of light, line and color to create visual stories from the flea markets of Paris to the dunes of Morocco and from Machu Picchu to Havana and beyond. She lives in New York.
Deborah Loeb Bohren is a fine art and travel photographer. Photography has been Deb’s passion since her father put a camera in her hand when she was only five years old. Today she combines that passion with her love of travel, using her camera to capture the intersection and interplay of light, line and color to create visual stories from the flea markets of Paris to the dunes of Morocco and from Machu Picchu to Havana and beyond. She lives in New York.
Previous post

Guns N' Roses Reunion in Las Vegas

Next post

Five Myths about Private Jets

No Comment

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *